Brain Tumor Research Center

Continuously funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) since 1972, the Brain Tumor Research Center (BTRC) at UCSF is internationally recognized as a major research and treatment center for adults and children with tumors of the brain and spinal cord.

The basic science laboratories of the BTRC, in collaboration with the Brain Tumor Center's Clinical Neuro-Oncology Program, emphasize translational research into the biology and behavior of brain tumors - research in which scientists and health care clinicians work in partnership to translate laboratory findings into new or improved forms of clinical therapy.


UCSF launched the new Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building on June 2, 2009, bringing all cancer research specialists at UCSF together under one roof. Watch the Abc 7 video coverage of the new, world-class facility and its impact on cancer research.

To continue to expand the facility, as well as build a new intraoperative imaging suite and establish a program dedicated to caregivers of patients with brain tumors, we invite you to join the Gordon Murray Initiative, in memory of Gordon Murray.

The BTRC Research Laboratories

Multi-laboratory Studies
Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE): The BTRC is one of four institutions to have received a SPORE grant for the study of brain tumors by the NCI. SPORE grants are intended to foster interaction between basic and applied scientists, providing them with the flexibility to rapidly test new approaches to the prevention and treatment of cancer.
 
Program Project Grant: The BTRC has been funded by a program project grant for 32 years. In 2007, BTRC investigators took this program in a new direction by incorporating studies of convection enhanced delivery into the the program's overall focus on neuroimaging.
 
Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Institute at UCSF: The Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation of the United States has granted the BTRC an Institute Award to study central nervous system tumors in children. The grant funds five research projects that focus on pediatric brainstem glioma and medulloblastoma.
 
Tumor Microenvironment Network: This group is funded by a five-year NIH U54 grant and includes three projects to study the microenvironment of brain tumors and how it relates to invasion and resistance to therapies.